Huntington Avenue Theatre

Huntington Avenue Theatre

Huntington Avenue Theatre

Designed and constructed as America’s first civic playhouse, the building today known as the the Huntington Avenue Theatre was the first tax-exempt theatre established in the nation.

Construction having begun in 1923, it was formally opened with Sheridan’s The Rivals on November 10‚ 1925. The architect was J. Williams Beal and Sons. Originally named the Repertory Theatre of Boston‚ the theatre was built to be a permanent home for the Henry Jewett Players‚ a Boston–based repertory theatre company.

In choosing to locate the theatre across from Symphony Hall and near the Museum of Fine Arts and the old Boston Opera House‚ the theatre’s creators intended to signify its character as a major cultural institution of Boston and its difference from the commercial playhouses in the Boylston‚ Washington‚ Tremont streets area of the city.

The Huntington Avenue Theatre is a 890-seat procenium-style theatre constructed in the 1920s. The theatre is not fully accessible. The space is regularly used for literary readings, lectures and talks, and press events in addition to theatre, opera, and dance.

The Studio 210 is a fully convertable black box space located on the second floor of the theatre’s wing. It has a seating capacity of 90. This performance space is not fully accessible. The space is regularly used for small performances, as well as social events.

Huntington Avenue Theatre | 264 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115
Theatre: 890
Studio: 90